Linda M. Hanson

Fellow - Research/Public Health Leadership
Wolfe Harris Center for Clinical Studies

Personal Information

Activity

Currently Teaching (2014-2015)

  • STRESS REDUCTION TECHNIQUES - THE SPIRIT COMPONENT

Current Research Interests

Expertise

  • Clinical trials
  • Central pain processing and functional magnetic resonance imaging
  • Qualitative research
  • Evidence based healthcare/evidence informed practice and faculty development

My fellowship experience affords me the opportunity to better understand the musculoskeletal conditions our patients commonly present with. My experience to-date has made me aware that while complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) modalities are commonly used, there is still a great need for sound clinical research investigating their mechanisms of action and effectiveness. For this reason, I’ve chosen to pursue a career as a researcher.

My goal is to understand how patients process pain and the interventions, expectations, and other factors that influence patient outcomes. Further, I enjoy educating and mentoring CAM students and other healthcare professionals about the concepts of evidence informed practice and am working to provide the necessary resources to translate the use of research in CAM practices.

When I’m not at the office, I love traveling, wining and dining with friends, reading, and enjoying all the arts have to offer.

Education

  • CPR/AED certification, 2011
  • Bachelor of Science - University of Victoria, 2006
  • Doctor of Chiropractic - Northwestern Health Sciences University, 2009

Publications

Haanstra TM, Hanson L, Evans R, van Nes FA, de Vet HC, Cuijpers P, and Ostelo RW. How do low back pain patients conceptualize their expectations regarding treatment? Content analysis of interviews. Eur Spine J. 2013 May 10. [Epub ahead of print]

Taylor B, Delagran L, Baldwin L, Hanson L, Leininger B, Vihstadt C, Evans R, Kreitzer MJ, Sierpina V. Advancing integration through evidence informed practice: Northwestern Health Sciences University's integrated educational model. Explore (NY). 2011;7(6):396-400.

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