Course Descriptions

ANAT1001 : ANATOMY AND PHYSIOLOGY 1
4.00 credits: The first in a two-part sequence of courses introduces students to the organization of the body on a chemical, cellular, tissue and system level. Integrating structures (anatomy) and their function (physiology) is a focus of each course in this sequence with this course focusing the skeletal/articular, muscular, and nervous systems in detail. The laboratory portion of the course will include the opportunity to observe prosected human cadavers.
ANAT1002 : ANATOMY AND PHYSIOLOGY 2
4.00 credits: This course builds on the material from Human Anatomy and Physiology I and explores the endocrine, cardiovascular, lymphatic/immune, integumentary, respiratory, digestive, urinary and reproductive systems. All systems are integrated using cross-sectional analysis of the human body. The laboratory portion of the course will include the opportunity to observe prosected human cadavers.
BIOC3110 : BIOCHEMISTRY
4.00 credits: This course will provide students with a solid background in fundamental biochemical concepts including amino acids, proteins, enzymes, biological buffers, carbohydrates, lipids, nucleotides, and metabolic cycles.
UGE3730 : BIOETHICS
3.00 credits: This course teaches students the structure and process of "doing ethics" relevant to real issues that emerge in professional health care settings. Students respond to case dilemmas, clarifying issues, values, and how they would resolve ethical conflicts. The course focuses on practical problem-solving. Students begin their preparation for professional life by anticipating ethical challenges and working on resolutions.
BIOL2020 : BIOLOGY TODAY
2.00 credits: This is a course that will cover basic biological sciences current events, human environmental questions, and socio-cultural issues, such as (but not limited to) cloning, genetically modified organisms, pollution, climate change, biofuels, euthanasia, evolution, stem cell research, animal and human subjects in research, and health/health care decisions. The course will help students learn about the role biology plays in our society and why it is important to not just understand, but also critically think about it.
CAP4900 : CAPSTONE PROJECT
2.00 credits: The Capstone project is designed as the culminating experience for the bachelors candidate in Human Biology that provides the student the opportunity to do three things. First, to demonstrate a mastery of the concepts and skills associated with the Human Biology curriculum by doing a research project. Second, to synthesize the student’s experiences and explorations as recorded in the student’s portfolio into a story of the student’s future pathways. Third, to communicate what the student has learned and accomplished in a report and presentation.
BIOL3010 : CELL BIOLOGY
4.00 credits: This course is a study of eukaryotic cells from both structural and functional viewpoints. Course emphasis is placed on the molecular mechanisms of cell metabolism, growth, division, cell responses to diseases, cellular communication and how cells create and use energy. Labs will provide into insights into cell experiments and methods. Mastering the material presented in this course will aid students planning careers in health fields and enhance their ability to understand issues in biology today.
UGE3710 : COMMUNICATION SKILLS FOR HEALTH PROFESSIONALS
3.00 credits: This course presents knowledge and skills for personal and professional communication. Students continue working to develop such clinical-practice-related written products as patient referral letters, clinic and educational pamphlets, press releases, cover letters, curriculum vitae, and letters to editors. Each student develops and gives an oral presentation including slides on a randomly-assigned general topic and audience type. All class slide presentations, often 20-30 talks, are then provided to all students in the class for their use as they begin marketing their practices.
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